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Events & exhibitions

Origin Stories: Keynote Address (1848)

  • Wednesday, August 26, 2020
    4 PM ET
  • Online on Zoom
Sepia toned image of a regiment of women in uniform (white or pale clothes and a dark sash) carrying staffs and marching in formation in a suffrage parade
A regiment of women in uniform (white or pale clothes and a dark sash) carrying staffs and marching in formation in a suffrage parade. Crowds look on from both sidewalks. See individual photos for additional description., May 3,1914

We will begin our series Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment with a keynote address by the historian Martha S. Jones, who will root the generations-long movement for women’s suffrage in the activism of African American women from the 1830s. Jones will explore the tangled intersections of gender and race in the battle for the ballot while considering the evolution of birthright citizenship, more broadly, as itself a gendered origins story about constituting the American people.

Event Video

Poster outlining details for the Women's Suffrage March Mass Meeting

WELCOME

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, Harvard University


FRAMING REMARKS

Jane Kamensky, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University


KEYNOTE

Martha S. Jones, Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and professor of history, Johns Hopkins University


DISCUSSION and Q&A

Moderated by Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history, Carnegie Mellon University

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